Episode 1

Are the side effects of chemotherapy more readily accepted because cancer is life threatening? - Dr Maryam Lustberg & Dr Corina van den Hurk

In our first episode, Richard meets with Dr. Maryam Lustberg, Chief of Breast Medical Oncology at Yale Cancer Centre, and Dr. Corina van den Hurk of the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer organisation. Maryam and Corina are both paving the way in side effect management for chemotherapy patients across the globe. We discuss their current research initiatives, their own personal connections with scalp cooling, and the need for better symptom management care, to improve patient’s quality of life as well as their treatment.

Key topics discussed:

6:59 – The impact of chemotherapy-induced hair loss on quality of life and self-image amongst patients, and why scalp cooling should always come down to patient choice

12:32 – Current research on persistent chemotherapy-induced alopecia as a result of taxane-based regimens

18:51 –  Challenging the status quo to ‘take the side effects as we are managing your cancer diagnosis’, and  the clinician’s responsibility to direct dialogue around side-effect management

23:59 – Importance of real world data and patient reported outcomes when it comes to effectively managing symptoms

27:21 – The work of MASCC on disparities within global cancer supportive care

30:18 – Corina’s work with the MASCC Oncodermatology Study Group on general supportive care, and the management of skin toxicities

33:06 – Discussion on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The impact on QoL, current intervention strategies, and symptom misinformation which may affect patient reported outcomes

Guests

Dr Corina van den Hurk, Clinical Researcher at the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL): IKNL (Integraal Kankercentrum Nederland)

Dr Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH, Chief of Breast Medical Oncology at Yale Cancer Centre and Director of The Breast Center at Smilow Cancer Hospital: Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH < Yale School of Medicine

Want to know how you can get involved in the International Scalp Cooling Registry? Email C.vandenHurk@iknl.nl for more information.

Additional Resources:

Clinical Studies Discussed

Permanent Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia in Patients with Breast Cancer: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study. (2019, Kang et al.) Permanent Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia in Patients with Breast Cancer: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study – PubMed (nih.gov)

Scalp cooling for hair preservation and associated characteristics in 1411 chemotherapy patients – Results of the Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry. (2012, van den Hurk et al.) Link: Scalp cooling for hair preservation and associated characteristics in 1411 chemotherapy patients – results of the Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry – PubMed (nih.gov)

Prospective study of hair recovery after (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy with scalp cooling in Japanese breast cancer patients. (2021, Ohsumi et al.) Link: Prospective study of hair recovery after (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy with scalp cooling in Japanese breast cancer patients – PubMed (nih.gov)

Download full transcript
Episode 1
Are the side effects of chemotherapy more readily accepted because cancer is life threatening? - Dr Maryam Lustberg & Dr Corina van den Hurk

In our first episode, Richard meets with Dr. Maryam Lustberg, Chief of Breast Medical Oncology at Yale Cancer Centre, and Dr. Corina van den Hurk of the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer organisation. Maryam and Corina are both paving the way in side effect management for chemotherapy patients across the globe. We discuss their current research initiatives, their own personal connections with scalp cooling, and the need for better symptom management care, to improve patient’s quality of life as well as their treatment.

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About this Episode

In our first episode, Richard meets with Dr. Maryam Lustberg, Chief of Breast Medical Oncology at Yale Cancer Centre, and Dr. Corina van den Hurk of the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer organisation. Maryam and Corina are both paving the way in side effect management for chemotherapy patients across the globe. We discuss their current research initiatives, their own personal connections with scalp cooling, and the need for better symptom management care, to improve patient’s quality of life as well as their treatment.

Key Topics Discussed

6:59 – The impact of chemotherapy-induced hair loss on quality of life and self-image amongst patients, and why scalp cooling should always come down to patient choice

12:32 – Current research on persistent chemotherapy-induced alopecia as a result of taxane-based regimens

18:51 –  Challenging the status quo to ‘take the side effects as we are managing your cancer diagnosis’, and  the clinician’s responsibility to direct dialogue around side-effect management

23:59 – Importance of real world data and patient reported outcomes when it comes to effectively managing symptoms

27:21 – The work of MASCC on disparities within global cancer supportive care

30:18 – Corina’s work with the MASCC Oncodermatology Study Group on general supportive care, and the management of skin toxicities

33:06 – Discussion on chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. The impact on QoL, current intervention strategies, and symptom misinformation which may affect patient reported outcomes

Guests

Dr Corina van den Hurk, Clinical Researcher at the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL): IKNL (Integraal Kankercentrum Nederland)

Dr Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH, Chief of Breast Medical Oncology at Yale Cancer Centre and Director of The Breast Center at Smilow Cancer Hospital: Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH < Yale School of Medicine

Want to know how you can get involved in the International Scalp Cooling Registry? Email C.vandenHurk@iknl.nl for more information.

Additional Resources:

Shownotes

Permanent Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia in Patients with Breast Cancer: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study. (2019, Kang et al.) Permanent Chemotherapy-Induced Alopecia in Patients with Breast Cancer: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study – PubMed (nih.gov)

Scalp cooling for hair preservation and associated characteristics in 1411 chemotherapy patients – Results of the Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry. (2012, van den Hurk et al.) Link: Scalp cooling for hair preservation and associated characteristics in 1411 chemotherapy patients – results of the Dutch Scalp Cooling Registry – PubMed (nih.gov)

Prospective study of hair recovery after (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy with scalp cooling in Japanese breast cancer patients. (2021, Ohsumi et al.) Link: Prospective study of hair recovery after (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy with scalp cooling in Japanese breast cancer patients – PubMed (nih.gov)

Transcript

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