Our CEO, Richard Paxman, talks to experts in their field and key opinion leaders from all over the world about side effect management in oncology and all things scalp cooling. 

What happens when you are a physician and a patient?
July 2021

Richard Paxman welcomes Dr Molly Greenwade along with her Oncologist, Dr Ron Bose, to give us a unique insight and perspective of cancer treatment and scalp cooling when Molly was faced with the reality of playing the part of the patient rather than her usual role as a Gynecologic Oncologist.

Coping with the Effects of Cancer Treatment on Hair and Skin.
April 2021

Richard Paxman welcomes Nicole LeBoeuf of Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Kristen Lo Sicco and Ian Tattersall of NYU Langone to explore coping with the effects of cancer treatment on the hair and skin.

How Advanced Practice Providers are essential to the care of oncology patients.
February 2021

Richard Paxman welcomes Danielle T. Calvano of White Plains Hospital Center for Cancer Care, Elahe Salehi of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Elizabeth Strand of Georgetown Hospital to uncover how the role of advanced practice providers has evolved to be such a crucial part of a patients care team.

How to implement or extend your scalp cooling program.
December 2020

Richard Paxman welcomes Dr. Erica Fischer-Cartlidge and Mikel Ross of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. To discuss how to improve the execution of your existing scalp cooling program, and also to understand best practice for the implementation of a new scalp cooling program in a multi-site world leading cancer center.

The Netherlands have played an incredibly important part in the leading the way in scalp cooling research.
October 2020

Dr Corina van den Hurk of Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation, Manon Komen of Northwest Clinics, Carla Peeters-Kloeze of Catharina Ziekenhuis and Dr Rieneke Lugtenberg of Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum. We will be discussing the clinical aspects of scalp cooling in chemotherapy induced alopecia from a Dutch perspective.

How scalp cooling prevents chemotherapy induced alopecia.
September 2020

Richard Paxman welcomes Dr Andrew Collett and Dr Nik Georgopoulos from the University of Huddersfield, for the next conversation of the series. To learn about the extensive research that is being carried out looking deeper in to the scientific mechanisms of how scalp cooling prevents chemotherapy induced alopecia.

The importance of scalp cooling as an option for patients to help prevent chemotherapy induced alopecia (CIA) in Australia.
August 2020

Richard Paxman welcomes Prof. Fran Boyle of Mater Hospital and Catherine Paterson of the University of Canberra & Canberra Health Services, for the next conversation of the series. Discussing Catherine’s paper ‘Identifying the supportive care needs of men and women affected by chemotherpy-induced alopecia? A systematic review’.

​Hear more about chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, a difficult side effect, and what is being done to help patients in the future.
July 2020

Richard Paxman welcomes Dr. Maryam Lustberg, MD, MPH, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center and Dr Raghav Sundar, Consultant, Department of Haematology-Oncology, National University Cancer Institute, for the next conversation of the series to hear more about chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy.

How Covid-19 has changed patient care from the perspective of a breast surgeon.
June 2020

Richard Paxman welcomes Dr. Manpreet Kohli, RWJ Barnabas Health Director of Breast Surgery at Monmouth Medical Centre and Dr. Eric Manahan, General Surgeon and Director of Breast Surgery at Hamilton Healthcare System, for the next conversation of the series. Discussing how Covid-19 has changed patient care from the perspective of a breast surgeon.

Scalp cooling & cancer care during COVID-19.
May 2020

Richard Paxman welcomes Dr. Amy Irwin and Ann Marie Bamford, RN of Virginia Cancer Specialists, part of the US Oncology Network, for the next conversation of the series discussing scalp cooling & cancer care during COVID-19.