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Pioneers in Scalp Cooling

We work alongside medical experts, professionals and world leaders in the field to provide extensive research, clinical studies and testing. Independent observational studies have demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of the Paxman Scalp Cooling System in the prevention of chemotherapy induced hair loss with widely used chemotherapy dosages and regimens.

All trials have reported high levels of patient comfort and acceptability, with low numbers of patients discontinuing scalp cooling. Our clinical efficacy brochure details the proven performance in five different studies carried out using the Paxman Scalp Cooling System.

United Kingdom Study

UK observational study reports an 89% success rate following use of the Paxman cold cap system in breast cancer patients, with only 11% with severe hair loss requiring wigs.

Download the UK Study of Efficacy




UK Clinical Study

Norway Study

Norwegian observational study reports a 92% success rate following use of the Paxman cold cap system in 54 breast cancer patients treated with FEC/FAC or paclitaxel.

Download the Norwegian Study of Efficacy




Norwegian Clinical Study

Netherlands Study 1

Observational study reports a 40% reduction of head covers when using the Paxman cold cap system in breast cancer patients.

Download the Netherlands Study of Efficacy 1




Netherlands Clinical Study

Netherlands Study 2

88% of patients didn’t require a head cover or wig following 45 minutes post-infusion cooling after 3 weekly docetaxel.

Download the Netherlands Study of Efficacy 2




Netherlands Clinical Study

Netherlands Study 3

48% success rate in patients treated with different cancer types.

Download the Netherlands Study of Efficacy 3




Swiss Study

93.7% patient assessment of scalp cooling was above reasonably well.

Download the Swiss Study of Efficacy




Lebanese Study

91.21% overall scalp cooling had excellent results in patients.

Download the Lebanese Study of Efficacy




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